California Federation of Business and Professional Women

The Mission of the CFBPW shall be to promote and support equity for working women in all phases of their lives and to promote personal empowerment and professional development.

PRESIDENT’S COMMUNIQUE – September 2017

Greetings CFBPW members,

The Board of Directors met this past weekend (Aug. 26-27) with much CFBPW Business accomplished. Your Executive Committee and Board of Directors dedicated many hours in preparation for and full participation in the meeting.  You have placed your trust with leaders who are truly leading and believe, Together we can do this!

CFBPW Fall Board - Officers, Chairs and Delegates

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fall Board of directors attendees (26) wearing white in recognition of Women’s Equality Day and yellow BPW ribbons in recognition of BPW-International.

 The following are plans and actions coming out of the 2017 Fall Board of Directors Meeting.

Bylaws & Resolutions

Chair Linda Wilson is asking Clubs and Districts to review their bylaws for updating.  If they have not been updated since 2006, then it’s time to revisit them.  We will be looking at the CFBPW procedures for presenting and adopting Resolutions to allow considerations other than just at Annual Conference.

Handbook & Policies & Procedures

Chair Linda J Lucas and her committee have undertaken the task of updated these essential documents.

Membership

Only 75 days into the new CFBPW year we are only nine members away from equalizing and we expect at least one new club before December 31, 2017.  The Membership and Marketing Team has created the professional Member Recruitment PowerPoint which will be ready for Club and District use soon – talking points are being developed and will be available via the website’s Members Only section or from the Membership Chair and Vice Chair.  Again we ask that you forward any name and contact information of anyone one anywhere who understands the importance of the CFBPW mission.  It doesn’t matter if they need our help or want to help.  The Membership Team will follow up with a letter of introduction to CFBPW and an offer of further discussion.  Send names to Bessie Hironimus, Membership & Marketing Chair at bessie-epwusa@hotmail.com

Public Policy

The purpose and mission of the Public Policy Committee is to educate and involve the members of CFBPW in the legislative process of the local, county and state governments. To this end the Chair, Vice Chair, District Public Policy Representatives, Screening Committee (three members), Candidate Endorsement Chair and Candidate Endorsement Committee (four members) and other interested members are included in this process.

Planning for the Public Policy Conference to be held February 24-25, 2018 in Sacramento will include workshops, trainings, review of the Public Policy Statement, Bill Screening and the selection of a 2018-19 Public Policy Focus Issue.  Workshops/trainings will include the basics of lobbying, coordination with other organizations, ballot Initiatives and involvement in local and county elections with group participation activities. Candidate Endorsement program with an emphasis on state legislative and elected positions, as well as our local and county officials including school boards, special districts i.e. parks, utilities etc. will be part of the agenda.

Please let this Chair or any of the other committee members know if you have any questions or suggestions for this committee – Linda J. Lucas, Chair of the Public Policy Committee rluca@sbcglobal.net 530 527-2460.

Small Business

Chair Manjul is encouraging us all to register our businesses with the BPW-I/UN collaborative program with the International Trade Center’s #SheTrades.  The goal is to register one million women entrepreneurs to market by 2020.  This is done via the BPW International website, http://bpw-international.org/business-registration.  This is a valuable membership benefit and recruitment tool.  Let’s use it.

Website

Webmaster Linda Wilson reminded us that each Club and District has a page on our website, https://bpwcal.org/, under the Member Clubs tab.  Please designate someone in your District and Club to keep the information current.  Suggested information:  Officers, time and location of your meetings, upcoming programs, photos of meetings or events.  This could be assigned to your PR Chair to update monthly.  It’s easy.  Simply send the information to Linda Wilson at lindalwilson@juno.com.

Young Professionals

YP Chair Sally McMahon will be reviewing bylaws and policies for YP for updates, and she encourages using this program as a membership recruitment tool.  Remember, the YP age parameters are 21-35.

Future Meetings

Winter Board of Directors and Public Policy Conference:  February 23-25, 2018 at Best Western Plus Sutter House and Blue Prynt Restaurant, Sacramento

Annual Conference:  May 18-20, 2018 in  Minden, NV (www.visitCarsonvalley.org) at the Carson Valley Inn (www.cvinn.com)

Image result for carson valley nv

Image result for carson valley nv

 

There is renewed enthusiasm in the California Federation and we are practicing our theme of,

Together we can do this!

Please contact President Katherine if you want to become an active part of this team jkw@gbis.com.

DISTRICT UPDATES

 Valley Sunset District: FALL CONFERENCE:  September 16, 2017 – THEME: WOMEN OF ACHIEVEMENT LOCATION:  Thousand Oaks Elks Lodge

 

 Northern District: FALL MEETING:  September 9, 10a-3p in beautiful Weaverville We are excited to have our state president attend and serve as our State Representative.  All are invited to attend.  Just let this president know @ ilovebpw@yahoo.com.
Trudy Waldroop, Northern District President

Sierra Mar District: Fall Conference: October 21st, 8:45 A.M.-2:30 P.M. at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, 2009 S. Garfield Avenue, Monterey Park. Morning speaker from Friends of Foster Children and afternoon speaker Rosemary Enzer on CASA.

Parliamentarian
TO:                  All Members
FROM:            Trudy Waldroop, CFBPW Parliamentarian
DATE:            June 28, 2017
SUBJECT:      CFBPW Bylaws Amendments at May 2017 Annual Conference to Article X Officers Section 2 and Article XIII Duties of Officers Section 6 A

After pursuing a nagging thought in the back of my head, I can now report that the bylaws amendment to the two Articles listed above regarding the parliamentarian, “Serve the State Federation without a vote at the Executive Committee and Board of Directors’ meetings” is illegal in the State of California. Specifically, this amendment to our bylaws is not in compliance with the California Corporations Code.  This change to the Code arose out of AB1233 and became effective on January 1, 2010 which states:             Nonprofit corporations may no longer have non-voting directors.
According the to bill the reason for the change is as follows.
SEC. 3. Section 5047.5 of the Corporations Code is amended to read:
5047.5. (a) The Legislature finds and declares that the services of directors and officers of nonprofit corporations who serve without compensation are critical to the efficient conduct and management of the public service and charitable affairs of the people of California.

The conference’s action of May 20, 2017 regarding the above subject will need to be corrected at the 2018 Annual Conference. In order to be in compliance with the State of California on this subject, CFBPW needs to either:

  • Re-instate the voting privileges to the parliamentarian.

OR

  • Remove the position of parliamentarian as an officer and member of the Board of Directors.

REPORT FOR NFBPWC ADVOCACY COMMITTEE SEPTEMBER 2017

1). August 21st the City of West Hollywood unanimously approved a Resolution in support of the EQUAL MEANS EQUAL initiative.  Their Resolution goes on to say, “The initiative will focus on educating the public about the legal status of women in the United States and will advocate for the ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) in states where it has not yet passed. Originally written by Alice Paul in 1923, the ERA affirms that women and men have equal rights. It simply states, ‘Equality of Rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.’” Please note: this is the version that NFBPWC supports. West Hollywood Mayor John Heilman goes on to say, “The Equal Rights Amendment must be ratified. It’s up to us to educate people everywhere about its importance, especially in states where it has not yet passed.” Kamala Lopez reports that they premiered the Spanish version of EQUAL MEANS EQUAL in downtown Los Angeles during Women’s Equality Week. This version is now available for screening. There were 66 people at the screening of EQUAL MEANS EQUAL in Hagerstown, MD on the evening of August 24th. In Minneapolis 180 people viewed EQUAL MEANS EQUAL. North Carolina had three or four sold out screenings. Kamala pointed out that September 17th is Constitution Day. On that day and week they plan to do a push to get colleges especially in the unratified States to screen EQUAL MEANS EQUAL. They are doing five college screenings in North Carolina. They are hoping the college students would help get ERA to be considered when the Legislative Session start in January in the unratified States. The young people need to say to the Legislatures enough is enough. We want equal rights now. Kamala pointed out that EQUAL MEANS EQUAL is not affiliated with the ERACoalition. The ERACoalition wants to start over with another version of the ERA. Kamala wants her group to complete the work and get two more States to ratify and Congress to extend the deadline so we can complete the work in a year so that ERA will take effect in 2020 – the 100th anniversary of women getting the right to vote. Kamala said, “We need to pressure the States to do what they need to do to ratify the ERA.” Kamala is starting to get billboards up in support of ERA.

2). There is nothing further to report on efforts in Congress, which is in recess until after Labor Day. There was a Lobby Day on August 25th in Washington, D.C. There were about 75 people at the rally. They did visit with the Chairs of the House and Senate Judiciary Committees. This group felt that we need to lobby California Senator and Minority Chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee Dianne Feinstein  to get the resolution extending the deadline for ratification of ERA out of the Senate Judiciary Committee. Feinstein is a co-sponsor of the bill. You still have time to ask your Congress people to be a co-sponsor of HJ Res. 53 Speier (CA-D) and SJ Res. 5 Cardin (MD-D) to remove the deadline for ratification of ERA in Congress. HJ Res 53 has 158 co-sponsors (all Democrats). Check https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-joint-resolution/53/cosponsors  to see if your Congressperson is on the list. If not, contact him or her to find out why he or she is not on it. SJ Res 5 has 33 co-sponsors (one Independent and the rest are Democrats).  Check https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/senate-joint-resolution/5/cosponsors to see if your State’s Senators are on the list. If not, contact him or her to find out why he or she is not on it. Urge your Senators to be co-sponsors. ERAAction  plans a “Thunderclap” action to send messages to the Congressional Committees telling them that we want hearings scheduled on the bills. We can participate by calling Representative Steve King for the House Subcommittee on the Constitution and Civil Justice (202) 225-4426 and Senator Chuck Grassley for the Senate Judiciary Committee (202) 224-3744 or visiting them in their offices. NFBPWC supports this bill which is called “The Three State Initiative.”

3). The ERACoalition has a new version of the Equal Rights Amendment. According to the ERACoalition Congress member Pramila Jayapal (D-WA) has agreed to be the lead sponsor for the bill. Her office is supposed to be close to getting a sponsor in the Senate. The ERACoalition hopes to introduce the bill in October. Their new version says –
I. Women in all their diversity shall have equal rights in the United States and every
place subject to its jurisdiction.
II. Equality of rights shall not be denied or abridged by the united States or by any
State on account of sex (including pregnancy, gender, sexual orientation, or
gender identity), and/or race (including ethnicity, national origin, or color), and/or
like grounds of subordination (such as disability or faith). Neither the United
States nor any State shall give force by law to disadvantages suffered by those
whose equality rights are denied or abridged.
III. To fully realize the rights guaranteed under this Article, Congress and the several
States shall take legislative and other measures to prevent or redress any
disadvantage suffered by individuals or groups because of past and/or present
discrimination, and shall take all steps requisite and effective to abolish
institutions that infringe the right to vote and to have that vote count equally.
IV. Nothing in Subsection II shall invalidate a law, program, or activity that is
protected or required under Subsections I and III.

4). Sharon Simmons, President of Boulder BPW, has a tool kit to help other Clubs to pass resolutions and ordinances in support of CEDAW. If you would like a copy of the tool kit, contact Sharon at hawksndragons1955@gmail.com. The Presidents of the Federations and Affiliates received this information and additional materials on CEDAW via an E-mail from NFBPWC Secretary Sandy Thompson.

5). Nancy Werner, EPW-PA President, reports that, “We support the work of CEDAW (Cities for the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women) and the city of Pittsburgh, PA [which] is presently addressing this issue. We are proud to have Mary Shaw as a member of this commission and part of our group. She is investigating what our group can do to help Pittsburgh and what our group can do in other Pennsylvania cities.”

6). Francesca Burack, President of NFBPWC-NYC, reports, “that in NYC we have banned the salary history questions from ALL employment processes. No longer will a woman have a life sentence of lower pay and an inability to properly provide for herself and her family because she is a woman! The Lt. Governor and all of the NYS Female Commissioners held hearings after a similar ban of the salary history questions did not get passed in NYS. It was close, but …. I represented NFBPWC-NYC and my company Fearless Talent Development providing the perspective from a businesswomen’s advocacy organization and an entrepreneur. I think we will get a bill passed statewide during the next legislative session…. We have passed three equal pay laws that go into effect over the next few years. Some are in effect now…. We have a paid family leave act that goes into effect January 1, 2018…. Our biggest challenge, in addition to getting more legislation passed, is monitoring these laws that are now on the books to ensure every company implements them.”

7). Paycheck Fairness Act H.R. 1869 would make it mandatory for employers to show the reason behind any pay differences and how they are not based on gender. The bill would also keep employers from punishing employees for seeking equal pay. It has 198 co-sponsors – 197 Democrats and 1 Republican. The Senate version S.819 has 43 co-sponsors – 42 Democrats and 1 Independent.

8). According to the August 30th “Feminist Daily Newswire,” “The Trump administration has announced that they will shut down a 2016 Obama-era initiative that empowered the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) to collect pay data sorted by gender, race, and ethnicity from businesses with 100 or more employees. The Trump administration called the rule, which would have required employers to provide only summary date, not specific salary information on individual employees, ‘enormously burdensome’ and unhelpful. But most employers were already prepared to file this data and a number of large public companies began widely disclosing this information in recent years. The policy was purposefully crafted with the employer community in mind and the goal of efficiency. The data collection, which would have begun in spring 2018, would have covered over 63 million employees and provided more concrete information on pay discrimination across industries and occupations. Unlike previous data collection initiatives, this one would have included information on benefits and retirement packages, and not simply wage information, providing a more comprehensive picture of the gender-race pay gap. The initiative was aimed at encouraging greater voluntary compliance with equal pay laws, but would have also helped the EEOC and the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) identify and focus their investigations on employers who flout the laws. In June, the Trump administration released a budget proposal that disbanded the Labor Department division that has been tasked with policing discrimination among federal contractors for nearly forty years. Thanks to the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) millions of dollars in settlements have been awarded to Americans, who without systematic audits from OFCCP may not have known that they were subject to discriminatory practices by their employers.”

9). According to the National Women’s History website http://www.womenshistory.org/advocate/status-legislation H.R. 19 and S. 1498 this “legislation
– States that the nation deserves a national women’s history museum.
– Establishes the museum.
– H.R. 19 identifies two possible sites on the National Mall.
– S. 1498 identifies two possible sites and allows for the Smithsonian Board of
Regents to identify an additional site.
– Requires private funds for the Museum construction.
– Authorizes federal funds for the planning, design and operations of the Museum.”
– As of 9/3/17, H.R. 19 has 246 cosponsors (190 Democrats and 56 Republicans).
April 4th it was referred to the Subcommittee on Federal Lands.
– S. 1498 has 13 (all Democrat), but the sponsor of the bill is Susan M. Collins (R-
ME). June 29th it was referred to the Senate Rules and Administration Committee.

10). The Women’s March group is planning a national conference for October 27th-29th at the Cobo Center in Detroit. They plan to have thousands of women attend to participate in workshops, strategy sessions and forums to prepare for the 2018 midterm elections. The general attendance fee is $295 + a fee of $8.37. The fee for youth and student registration (the age of 25 and under) is $125 + a fee of $4.12. These sale prices end September 16th. The organization is working to raise money for those who cannot pay this fee to attend.

11). According to WIPP (Women Impacting Public Policy) “there are five myths about health care worth debunking:
1. Fixing the ACA (Obamacare) is Dead: Yes, for the time being it is, but not in the long run. If you listen to speeches delivered from Democrats and Republicans, healthcare is far too important to the public and this sector of the economy to ignore. Senator McCain and others pleaded for the Senate to go through the committee process, which includes hearings and collaboration, to pass comprehensive legislation. In Capitol Hill-speak, that process is called ‘regular order.’ That is likely the next move for Congress.
2. Republicans Control the Congress and the Executive Branch so Passage Should be Easy:  This oft-repeated statement assumes that all Republicans think alike. In reality, the party runs the gamut of ultra-conservative to moderate to libertarian-ish. So, it’s not surprising that when it comes to healthcare reform, the party is all over the map. Getting Republicans to agree to a bill is a tall order given these different philosophical bents in both the House and Senate.
3. Democrats Don’t Want to Fix Obamacare: If you thought the Republicans are a disorganized bunch, take a look at the Democrats. They often pride themselves on their chaotic ways. Sure, some Democrats believe Obamacare is perfect, but the vast majority do not. In closing remarks of the Senate debate, Senator Schumer acknowledged the law needed revision, stating ‘it’s not perfect – let’s work together.’ 4. The Congressional Budget Office is Partisan: Since the agency’s formation in 1975, the CBO’s budget scorekeeping on major public policy proposals has been criticized by politicians when estimates didn’t agree with their positions. The head of the CBO is appointed by the party in power and its mission is nonpartisan.
5. Reform Will Result in Reduced Premiums: Health insurance is a risk pool. Structuring the pool to include enough healthy people to subsidize the unhealthy people is a balance Obamacare was largely unsuccessful in achieving. The other side of the equation is the expense side of the delivery of healthcare—which is anything but transparent. Premiums will not come down until these two problems are resolved. Nibbling around the edges of health insurance regulations or a simple repeal will not achieve reduced premiums.”

12). According to the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, “Women remain dramatically underrepresented in science, technology and math (STEM) fields. Unfortunately, the gap seems unlikely to narrow any time soon. The share of STEM degrees awarded to women increased from 20.2 percent in 1977 to 33.9 percent in 2000, but has since not budged (at 33.5 percent in 2010). Women are still underrepresented in patent-intensive STEM fields. In 2010, fewer than one in five engineering degree-holders was a woman. In computer science, women are actually falling further behind. In 1980 women held roughly 35 percent of computer science degrees; by 2010, women had just 21 percent of the degrees in that field. Even when women do obtain STEM degrees, they are underrepresented in research and development, the most patent-intensive job tasks. For example, among those in nonacademic careers, 61 percent of men but only 46 percent of women with STEM doctoral degrees work in development and design. However, in 2010, only 18.8 percent of patents granted in the United States named one or more women as members of the invention team. These data are particularly disturbing given that mixed-sex inventing teams tend to produce better results than single-sex teams. According to the report, higher-quality research and innovation may flow from the gender diversity itself and/or the larger size of mixed-gender teams compared to single-sex work-groups. Either way, women’s underrepresentation among inventors seems to inhibit innovation. The report documents that increasing women’s participation in patenting could lead to a number of important societal benefits:
–  The total number of patents awarded would significantly increase, boosting
productivity in the economy as a whole.
–  Women-owned businesses would become more competitive, as crucial start-up
capital tends to flow to firms that apply for patents.
–  The value of patent-holding firms might rise substantially, as higher-quality
patents are linked to increases in companies’ market value.
Improving women’s access to STEM fields may help narrow both the patenting gap and the wage gap. IWPR research has found that women are most likely to work in STEM occupations in the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Massachusetts, which are also the three states with the highest median annual earnings for women. Yet, while the median annual earnings for women are $64,000 in STEM fields, women are only 28.8 percent of workers in those fields.” What can NFBPWC do to encourage young women to go into these fields?

13). Nothing further has happened to S.1038. According to WIPP (Women Impacting Public Policy), “Recently, Senators Joni Ernst (R-IA) and Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) introduced bipartisan legislation (S. 1038) in response to WIPP’s ‘Do Not Enter Report: Women Shut Out of the Government’s Largest Contracts.’ The report found that major contracts leave women-owned small businesses (WOSBs) out, as only a third of the contracts examined reserved tracks for WOSBs. However, the report also showed that when women were awarded contracts, they successfully competed for task orders. The bill asks the Small Business Administration (SBA) to conduct a comprehensive study on all socio-economic group participation, including women, service-disabled veteran-owned small businesses, and those participating in the 8(a) and Historically Underutilized Business Zones (HUBZone) programs on these contracts. This is an important step to ensure that all small businesses have equal access to contracts, increasing opportunities for women-owned small businesses (WOSBs). We urge WIPP members to ask their legislators to support S. 1038 by signing on as a co-sponsor.” It has two additional co-sponsors to the original writers of the bill. August 2nd it was referred to the Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship and reported by Senator Risch with an amendment in the nature of a substitute.
Linda Wilson, NFBPWC  2nd Vice President, Legislation

REPORT FOR NFBPWC ADVOCACY COMMITTE AUGUST 2017

1). Congress is in recess until after Labor Day. Your Congress members will be home in your Districts. This is a perfect time to ask them to be a co-sponsor of HJ Res. 53 Speier (CA-D) and SJ Res. 5 Cardin (MD-D) to remove the deadline for ratification of ERA in Congress. HJ Res 53 has 158 co-sponsors (all Democrats). Check https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-joint-resolution/53/cosponsors  to see if your Congressperson is on the list. If not, contact him or her to find out why he or she is not on it. SJ Res 5 has 33 co-sponsors (one Independent and the rest are Democrats).  Check https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/senate-joint-resolution/5/cosponsors to see if your State’s Senators are on the list. If not, contact him or her to find out why he or she is not on it. Urge your Senators to be co-sponsors. ERAAction  plans a “Thunderclap” action to send messages to the Congressional Committees telling them that we want hearings scheduled on the bills. We can participate by calling Representative Steve King for the House Subcommittee on the Constitution and Civil Justice (202) 225-4426 and Senator Chuck Grassley for the Senate Judiciary Committee (202) 224-3744 or visiting them in their offices.

2). Sandy Oestreich, founder-president of National Equal Rights Amendment Alliance Inc., reports, “Florida Constitutional Revision Commission (rare among states) meets every 20 years. Since our Florida ratification bills have been denied a Hearing by our very partisan House legislature for all of the bills and legislation for 17 years, we spoke at their June 2017 meeting. We urged revision of Florida’s Constitution, which does not define the process for selection of bills to be heard. Currently, Florida Speaker of the House and Senate President each decide, an overreach of power and possibly an abrogation of the U.S. Constitution’s 1st Amendment re: Free Speech. We have further plans as this is unlikely to be changed.”

3). Kamala Lopez, the star and producer of EQUAL MEANS EQUAL film, is working to have her film shown during Women’s Equality Week (August 21st-27th) around the country. She said there are 104 screenings that she knows about with 14 of those in unratified States. She says that people leave the screenings motivated to do something. She has a goal of two more States ratified by August 26, 2018. Katrina’s Dream: Promoting the Full Inclusion of Women in the Church and Society is sponsoring a special Women’s Equality Week (August 24th-27th) program in Washington, D.C. It will be kicked off with a showing of the film EQUAL MEANS EQUAL on Thursday, August 24th. Their third annual rally continues the next day with action on Capitol Hill. There will be two days of dialogue, panels, interfaith vigil, walk and rally. In addition, there will be two performances of the play “24 Words.” This is a musical about equal rights starting in 1776 and ending with Congress passing ERA in 1972. The group doing the play is from Chicago and seems to be willing to do the play other places on the east coast and Chicago area. Check https://equalmeansequal.org/event-calendar/  or https://www.facebook.com/pg/equalmeansequalmovie/events/?ref=page_internal for showings around the country. They will also have some billboards around the country on the campaign and EQUAL MEANS EQUAL. La Plaza de Cultura y Artes in Los Angles will be premiering the Spanish version of the film for Women’s Equality Week. Lopez’ group will be selling t-shirts to support the programs in Washington, D.C. and other places. This is not the same t-shirt as the ERACoalition is selling.

4). The ERACoalition is launching an “Equal Rights Now” black t-shirt campaign. The t-shirt features a photo from the 1970s of Gloria Steinem and Dorothy Pitman Hughes with their fist raised and “Equal Rights Now” posted over the bottom of the photo. The ERACoalition plans to show celebrities wearing this t-shirt. If you want to purchase one to support the ERACoalition see www.represent.com/equalrights. The t-shirts are $24.99. There are also sweatshirts and hoodies available with the same photo on them.

5). From Sharon Simmons, President of Boulder BPW, reports that “a CEDAW Resolution was passed in Lafayette and Louisville, Colorado. Greeley, Colorado has a Cities for CEDAW Proclamation with a five-year plan to obtain an Ordinance. Boulder and Denver completed a gender wage equity analysis within their cities. There are currently six other cities in various stages of considering a resolution/ordinance, including: Erie, Lyons, Longmont, Nederland, Golden and Westminster – for a total of ten cities.” Sharon Simmons and Veronica Hrutkay of the United Nations Association of Boulder County/Zonta Foothills are working on a toolkit to help other places replicate their successes. They are willing to share this toolkit when completed. One big piece of advice is to build coalitions of other organizations in your communities to work on having your city or county or State do this. Look at http://cedaw-colorado.org to keep updated on what Colorado is doing.

6). According to the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, “If working women were paid the same as men of the same age, with similar education and hours of work, who have the same urban/rural status and live in the same region of the country,

  • Nearly two-thirds of working single mothers – 4.7 million — would get a pay raise;
  • Roughly 26 million children would benefit from their mothers’ higher earnings;
  • More than 2.5 million children with a working mother would be lifted out of poverty.
  • Nearly 2 million children of working single mothers would be lifted out of poverty.

Wiping out the pay gap would also benefit working women with no children or other dependents. Roughly 15.3 million working American women — including divorced, widowed, separated, and never-married women — live independently of other family members. These single working women would earn an average of $6,613 more per year if they were paid the same as comparable men — a total pay raise of over $100 billion. The poverty rate among single women would drop by more than half, from 10.8 percent to 4.4 percent.

Unfortunately, progress toward pay equity continues to be slow. In 2015, women working full-time, year-round earned just 80 cents for every dollar that men earned. At this rate, women will not achieve equal pay until 2059.  Women of color will have to wait a century or more. Latinas will not reach pay equity with white men until 2248; Black women will achieve that goal in 2124.

Despite these inequities, women’s earnings are increasingly important for their families’ economic stability. Half of all American households with children under 18 have a breadwinner mother, i.e., a single mother who heads a household or a married mother who provides at least 40 percent of the couple’s joint earnings. And many women without children, both single and married, work to support themselves and other family members. The enduring gender pay gap thus will continue to have an impact on daily life for generations of American children and families.”

7). According to the July 14, 2017 “AAUW Washington Update,” “San Francisco made strides for pay equity on Tuesday [7/11/17] by prohibiting employers from asking job applicants about their salary history. The law would apply to all employers in the city and helps protect women from wage discrimination. Studies have shown that disclosing salary history may disadvantage women because they often start with lower pay than men. In addition, ensuring all candidates for a job are treated equally in providing salary history may help fight gender bias in negotiation that sometimes occurs when prospective employees voluntarily withhold that information.”

8). In a recent opinion piece in “Inside Higher Ed,” Sarah Labadie highlighted the need for accessible and affordable child care. President Trump’s proposed budget plans to eliminate the Child Care Access Means Parents in School program (CCAMPIS). The program provides child care for low-income parents enrolled in institutions of higher education and is funded by the U.S. Department of Education. Since 2004, the number of college students raising children has gone up by 30 percent — at the same time, availability of on-campus child care is dwindling.

9). According to the July 14, 2017 “AAUW Washington Update” the Smithsonian Women’s History Museum Act HR 19, which would establish a women’s history museum under the Smithsonian Institution and establish a Council to advise and assist the Smithsonian relating to administration, operation, maintenance and preservation of the museum, has collected enough co-sponsors to pass the House of Representatives. There are 246 co-sponsors – 190 Democrats and 56 Republicans. This is the next step in the formation of a Women’s History Museum. April 7th it was referred to the Subcommittee on Federal Lands. The Senate bill S.1498 has 13 co-sponsors – all Democrats, but the sponsor of the bill is Susan M. Collins (R-ME) along with Dianne Feinstein (D-CA). June 19th it was referred to the Senate Rules and Administration Committee.

10). According to WIPP (Women Impacting Public Policy), “Recently, Senators Joni Ernst (R-IA) and Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) introduced bipartisan legislation (S. 1038) in response to WIPP’s ‘Do Not Enter Report: Women Shut Out of the Government’s Largest Contracts.’ The report found that major contracts leave women-owned small businesses (WOSBs) out, as only a third of the contracts examined reserved tracks for WOSBs. However, the report also showed that when women were awarded contracts, they successfully competed for task orders. The bill asks the Small Business Administration (SBA) to conduct a comprehensive study on all socio-economic group participation, including women, service-disabled veteran-owned small businesses, and those participating in the 8(a) and Historically Underutilized Business Zones (HUBZone) programs on these contracts. This is an important step to ensure that all small businesses have equal access to contracts, increasing opportunities for women-owned small businesses (WOSBs). We urge WIPP members to ask their legislators to support S. 1038 by signing on as a co-sponsor.” It has two additional co-sponsors to the original writers of the bill. August 2nd it was referred to the Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship and reported by Senator Risch with an amendment in the nature of a substitute.

Linda Wilson, NFBPWC  2nd Vice President, Legislation

Club Treasurers please send your 2017-18 dues to Treasurer Elaine as soon as possible.

We have Postcards (hope you have some) available for many uses:

·         – Encourage legislators to support or oppose legislation as per our Screening Committee.

·         – Thank legislators for supporting or opposing legislation as per our Screening Committee.

·         – Invite women to a meeting.

·         – Thank City and County officials for doing something to benefit local women.

·         – Congratulations on special appointments – women or men.

·         – Congratulate business women on opening a new business.

·         – Congratulate a young woman on her appointment to West Point/Annapolis…

·         – Congratulate a young woman for any honor.

·         Be creative!

There is a box full of them and this officer will be happy to send you more if you need them.  Or better yet, pick some up at Winter Board.